Have immigration questions? Talk to an experienced immigration attorney with our Ask an Attorney Program.
Jonathan Petts

Jonathan Petts

Attorney

Jonathan is the proud husband and son of American immigrants. Prior to co-founding ImmigrationHelp.org, Jonathan practiced at two international law firms and graduated from both law school and college at the University of Pennsylvania. He has served as an advisor on international law to both the IMF and the World Bank. In 2017, Jonathan was recognized by FastCase as one of the 50 most innovative leaders in the legal profession. When he isn’t fighting for immigrant rights, Jonathan can be found at the gym, traveling, watching soccer, and reading.


Articles written by Jonathan Petts

What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Denied” Mean for My Form I-129F Application?

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you see “Case Was Denied” as your USCIS case status online, it means that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has received and reviewed your Form I-129F and decided not to grant you a K-1 fiancé visa. If USCIS denies your case, it will mail you a denial notice explaining why. It can be disheartening to go through months of processing for a fiancé visa only to have your case denied. If this happens, you may want to get legal advice about the next steps. If you decide to appeal your case, we can refer you to a good immigration attorney for help.

Read More →

Can a DACA Recipient Get a Green Card Through Marriage?

Written by Jonathan Petts

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program doesn’t yet provide a pathway to lawful permanent residence. But if you’re a DACA recipient and you fall in love with and marry a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, you may be able to get a marriage green card.  As a green card holder, you’ll have protection from deportation and long-term employment authorization, meaning you’ll never have to renew your work permit. Getting an immigrant visa is also the first step towards naturalization - the process of gaining U.S. citizenship. But to change your immigration status from DACA recipient to green card holder, you must satisfy certain eligibility requirements.  Your green card eligibility will depend largely on how you entered the United States and if you’re married to a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident. This article explains the different ways that DACA recipients can qualify for marriage green cards and how long the process takes.

Read More →

What are the benefits of getting a green card?

Written by Jonathan Petts

More than a million people in the United States live in lawful permanent resident status. People become permanent residents in different ways,- through marriage, close family members, employment, and others. There are several benefits of holding a green card. This article explains green card benefits, the responsibilities of having a green card, and some limitations green card holders face.

Read More →

What Is Temporary Protected Status (TPS)?

Written by Jonathan Petts

The secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) grants Temporary Protected Status or “TPS” to some foreigners whose home countries are not safe for their return. This article gives an overview of TPS, including its history and benefits for those eligible. The article also covers which countries have TPS, TPS eligibility requirements and application process.

Read More →

What Is Immigration Court?

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you are a foreigner or immigrant living in the United States, you may come in contact with the U.S. immigration court system. This article is an introduction to the U.S. immigration court system. It explains what immigration court is, what kinds of cases would lead you to immigration court, and whether there is an opportunity to appeal immigration court decisions.

Read More →

All You Need To Know About Form I-589, Application for Asylum and for Withholding of Removal

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you want to apply for asylum in the United States, you must submit U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Form I-589 within one year of arriving in the United States. You’ll also need to submit documents to support your application. This article will help you understand how to fill out form I-589 and what supporting documentation you’ll need to provide. It will also cover some tips to help ensure your application has the best chance of success.

Read More →

What Happens to Your Immigration Status When You Get Divorced?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Getting divorced may affect your immigration status, depending on what type of marriage green card you have. Divorce won’t affect the status of people who have permanent green cards, but it can delay their application for naturalization. If you have a conditional green card and you get divorced, it may be more difficult to get a permanent green card. This article discusses how divorce can affect immigration status and how people with conditional green cards can still apply to become permanent U.S. residents, even after their marriage ends.

Read More →

How to Complete Form I-765 WS for Your DACA Application

Written by Jonathan Petts

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) provides protection from deportation for many young undocumented immigrants. When you're applying for DACA, you'll submit three main forms together with your supporting evidence to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). In addition to the official DACA application Form I-821D, Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, you'll have to file Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and Form I-765WS, the worksheet explaining why you need a work permit. This article will focus on the shortest out of the three forms—Form I-765WS. You'll learn what Form I-765WS is and why you need it, as well as how to complete the different parts of the form.

Read More →

What Is the National Visa Center?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Getting a visa to live or work in the United States usually begins with submitting a petition to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). After USCIS approves the petition, it transfers it to the National Visa Center (NVC). The NVC then handles the visa application process, which includes receiving forms, collecting fees, reviewing documents, and setting up the consular interview.

Read More →

Can I File Form I-485 While in Removal Proceedings?

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you are eligible, you can file Form I-485, Adjustment of Status Application, even if you are in removal proceedings and the U.S. government is trying to deport you. This process might seem unusual, but in some situations, you may be eligible to adjust your immigration status with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Read on to learn when, why, and how you might file Form I-485 during a removal proceeding.

Read More →

How to Get U.S. Citizenship if you have a Marriage Green Card

Written by Jonathan Petts

Many immigrants in the United States become citizens through the naturalization process. When you have your marriage green card, you can begin to think about naturalizing as a U.S. citizen. All lawful permanent residents can apply to become U.S. citizens. As an American citizen, you'll be eligible to vote in all state and national elections, apply for federal jobs, and live abroad however long you want. You will also never be deported from the United States as a U.S. citizen. This article explains the requirements for naturalizing as a citizen if you hold a marriage green card. It also explains the naturalization process itself.

Read More →

How To Write a Cover Letter for Form I-129F (Petition for Alien Fiancé)

Written by Jonathan Petts

To prepare a K-1 fiancé(e) visa application for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), you must complete the required forms, gather supporting documents, and pay fees. It’s not mandatory to include a cover letter in your application packet, but doing so can help keep your application materials organized and make sure you don’t miss any required documents. You can also use the cover letter to highlight anything you want USCIS to know about your visa application. This article explains what a K-1 fiancé visa cover letter is and the elements it should include. There’s also a template you can use to write your own.

Read More →

Types of Relief From Removal Proceedings: An Overview

Written by Jonathan Petts

When the U.S. government wants you out of the country, they’ll try to deport you with a removal proceeding. If you find yourself in this situation, you have several forms of relief available, including voluntary departure, adjustment of status, cancellation of removal, asylum, and more. Many of these can delay or stop your deportation, although they’re not always easy to get or applicable to every situation. After reading this article, you should have a general idea of some of the more common forms of relief available and how they work.

Read More →

What Is USCIS Form I-130: Petition for Alien Relative?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Every year, many U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents sponsor green card applications for their close family members who are foreign nationals. The first step in most family-based green card application processes is filing the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Form I-130, officially called the Petition for Alien Relative. USCIS uses this form to verify a real and qualifying relationship between the green card sponsor and the green card applicant. In this article, we discuss the purpose of Form I-130, who can and can’t file Form I-130, the Form I-130 filing fees, and how long it takes USCIS to process the form.

Read More →

How To Renew DACA in 2022

Written by Jonathan Petts

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) allows eligible immigrant youth to get two-year renewable work permits. It also provides protection from removal proceedings. DACA has faced many legal challenges over the past five years. The Trump Administration tried to end the program, but a U.S. Supreme Court decision prevented that. Even so, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) was only accepting and processing DACA renewals. While President Biden signed an executive order to reinstate the program fully — allowing both new applications and renewals — a judge ruled in favor of a group of Texas attorney generals who argued that DACA is unconstitutional. As a result, USCIS is accepting renewals but no longer processing new DACA applications. This means only immigrants who have received DACA in the past are still eligible to renew their status. Renewing your DACA status and work permit costs $495 and takes 6-12 months. This guide explains everything you need to know about renewing your DACA status.

Read More →

How to Apply for a Change of Status From a Visitor Visa to a Marriage Green Card

Written by Jonathan Petts

Every year, many foreign nationals meet and fall in love with U.S. citizens and permanent residents while in the country on a B-1/B-2 visitor visa. Many couples choose to make their home in the United States. When that happens, the foreign spouse needs to get a green card to live in the country legally. U.S. immigration law allows immigrants on tourist visas to petition for an adjustment of status from their visitor visa to a green card, but the foreign spouse must meet certain eligibility criteria to do so. In this article, we describe how a foreign spouse qualifies to apply for a marriage green card while on a visitor visa, and what the application process is like when they are changing their immigration status.

Read More →

How can DACA and TPS Students Get Advance Parole for Educational Purposes?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and beneficiaries of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) under U.S. immigration law can travel abroad to study without compromising their immigration status. Advance Parole is a document that allows students with these immigration statuses to spend some time outside of the United States and return. People who also have pending adjustment of status green card applications can also apply for Advance Parole so they can study abroad without abandoning their applications. ImmigrationHelp.org is a nonprofit that can help you prepare your Advance Parole application for free. In this article, we'll highlight the educational reasons that can be the basis of an Advance Parole application, and then explain the application process itself.

Read More →

A Comprehensive Guide to the U.S. Citizenship Test

Written by Jonathan Petts

The U.S. Citizenship Test is one of the most important aspects of your citizenship application. You'll need to pass the test to become an American citizen, and you can only take the exam twice. This article is a comprehensive guide to the U.S. Citizenship Test. It explains what to expect on the test, how you should prepare, whether you can request special accommodations if you have a disability, who's exempt from taking the test, and what happens after you take it.

Read More →

Do You Need To Provide Tax Returns To File for Naturalization?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Everyone who works in the United States must file taxes with the IRS. This requirement includes lawful permanent residents and nonimmigrants with U.S. employment authorization. If you intend to naturalize as a U.S. citizen eventually, you will need to provide tax returns as part of your application, so it is essential to understand your tax filing requirements. This article explains all you should know about filing tax returns for your current or upcoming naturalization application.

Read More →

Same-Sex Couples and Marriage Green Card Applications: Common Questions and Concerns About the Process

Written by Jonathan Petts

Same-sex couples must be treated equally under U.S. immigration law thanks to the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in the United States v. Windsor case, which struck down the Defense of Marriage Act. Even further, in 2015, the Supreme Court ruled in Obergefell v. Hodges that every state be required to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Following both Supreme Court rulings, gay marriage is legal in every U.S. state. Accordingly, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) will view same-sex marriages the same as opposite-sex marriages in deciding on family green card applications. USCIS will not factor in the spouses' genders or biological sexes in making visa application decisions. Same-sex spouses of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents are welcome to apply for marriage green cards, just like heterosexual couples. However, gay and lesbian couples do face some unique challenges in applying for a marriage green card. This article discusses these challenges and explains how to address them.

Read More →

K1 Fiancé Visas vs. Marriage Green Cards: What Are the Differences?

Written by Jonathan Petts

U.S. citizens who would like to marry their foreign fiance have two options to bring their partner to the United States: a marriage green card (spouse visa) through Consular Processing or a K-1 fiance visa. U.S. green card holders may not apply for a K-1 Visa. The main differences between a K-1 fiance visa and a marriage green card are their timing, location, and cost. The K-1 visa is often the quicker option for international couples. It takes 9-15 months and costs $800. With this visa, the couple can begin life in the U.S. immediately after their wedding. They will still have to apply for a marriage green card for the foreign spouse to stay in the U.S. The process of adjusting status from a K-1 fiance visa to a marriage green card takes 4-6 months and costs $1225. Consular marriage green cards (spouse visas) are issued after the couple is married outside of the U.S. The consular marriage green card application process takes 11-32 months and costs $1,210. The foreign spouse cannot move to the U.S. until the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) approves their green card application. Choosing between a K-1 fiance visa and a spouse visa can be tricky, but this article is here to help!

Read More →

What Is Form G-1145, E-Notification of Application/Petition Acceptance?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Mailing your completed application packet to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) is an exciting time. You have finally finished gathering your documents and filing fees for the immigration benefit you applied for, and now it's up to USCIS to process your application. There are multiple ways to keep up with USCIS' processing of your application. In addition to tracking your case status online with the USCIS website, you can sign up to receive email and text notifications about updates to your application using Form G-1145. This article explains what Form G-1145 is, and whether you should consider filing the form.

Read More →

How To Get a TPS Work Permit

Written by Jonathan Petts

Temporary Protected Status or TPS is a kind of humanitarian relief issued by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to citizens of countries affected by political, social, or environmental instability. While in Temporary Protected Status, you may be granted U.S. work authorization. This article explains how to get a TPS work permit and how long you may hold a valid work permit as part of your TPS.

Read More →

How To Get an I-94 Extension and Extend Your Stay in the U.S.

Written by Jonathan Petts

While on a temporary visit to the United States, it is essential to be aware of the terms of your stay. In particular, you should be conscious of your I-94 expiration date. If your I-94 expires before you leave the U.S., you must plan to get an I-94 extension so you don’t break U.S. immigration law. This article explains what the I-94 extension is and how to get one. It also covers what documents are required for an extension and how long it takes for the U.S. government to process your extension request.

Read More →

Can You Apply for Advance Parole With a Criminal Record?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Getting status and other U.S. immigration benefits may be out of reach for people with criminal records. If you have ever committed a felony, for example, you can't get immigration benefits. Advance Parole is a travel permit available to special immigrants and those adjusting status to green cards. For example, if you have Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) status, you can travel abroad and return with Advance Parole. This article explains how you can qualify for Advance Parole and whether or not a criminal record can keep you from getting Advance Parole.

Read More →

How to get a marriage green card if you have a TN visa

Written by Jonathan Petts

As part of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), nationals of Canada or Mexico can work in the United States through the special TN visa classification. Many of these NAFTA professionals build connections and form relationships with Americans that could end up in marriage. The TN visa is not a "dual-intent" visa. This means changing status to a green card after marrying a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident can be tricky, but it is still possible. This article explains how to get a marriage green card if you have a TN visa and some considerations to bear in mind.

Read More →

How to Get a Green Card for Your Child (a Step-by-Step Guide)

Written by Jonathan Petts

As a lawful permanent resident (Green Card holder), or U.S. Citizen, you can petition for your foreign-born child who is seeking U.S. resident status to immigrate to the United States and receive their own Green Card. The marital status and age of your children tend to be the largest factors for this application process. We can help you p[repare your Child Green Card application paperwork](http://b.link/immigrationscreener) for free with our simple web app. Read on to learn more.

Read More →

How To Get a Copy of Your Marriage Certificate for Your Green Card Application

Written by Jonathan Petts

Every couple must provide evidence of a valid marriage involving a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident to complete their marriage green card application. This article explains how to get a copy of your marriage certificate for your application, which alternative documents you can submit, and what to do if there’s no legal record of your marriage.

Read More →

How To Prepare DACA Forms for Free With ImmigrationHelp

Written by Jonathan Petts

ImmigrationHelp.org is a nonprofit with a mission to help cut down the cost of legal fees for eligible low-income Dreamers. ImmigrationHelp is not an immigration law firm or accredited representative that provides legal advice. Even though ImmigrationHelp is not a form preparation service, we help with many immigration application types, and most of them follow a similar process. Our service is interactive, and the faster you respond, the sooner we can get you your completed forms. Generally, we hope to help you file your forms two weeks after you first contact us to work together. This article will focus on how to complete a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) renewal application or new DACA application with ImmigrationHelp.org’s system.

Read More →

How To Get Military Records for Your Immigration Application

Written by Jonathan Petts

To join the U.S. military, you must either be a U.S. citizen or a lawful permanent resident. In the past, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients could join the military through the Military Accessions Vital to National Interest (MAVNI) program, which ended in 2016. Most immigration applications you submit will ask that you provide any military service records if you were a member of the U.S. military or any foreign military service at any point in time. You will need to attach your military service records to your application forms when you're submitting them to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). This article explains what military service information you need to provide for your application and how to get a copy of your records.

Read More →

What are the Requirements for Naturalization in the United States?

Written by Jonathan Petts

In addition to holding their green cards for a 3-year or 5-year minimum, lawful permanent residents of the United States must also meet specific requirements to naturalize as U.S. citizens. This article details each requirement for naturalization, how to meet it as a naturalization applicant, and any exemptions that may apply.

Read More →

What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Received” Mean for My Form I-129F Application?

Written by Jonathan Petts

When you see the case status “Case Was Received” from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), it means USCIS is acknowledging that it received your immigration application packet. This is just the start of USCIS processing your application. It hasn’t yet reviewed your application materials or determined your eligibility. Once you see this status, you’ll want to keep an eye on future status changes and respond to anything that requires your attention, such as a request for evidence. This article explains the “Case Received” USCIS status and what to do when your application is in this status.

Read More →

What Supporting Documents Do I Need for a DACA Application? Checklists for New Applications and Renewals

Written by Jonathan Petts

When you file your DACA renewal or new DACA application, you will need to submit supporting documents to prove that you are eligible for DACA. The documents you need to submit will be different depending on whether you are renewing or applying for the first time. They will also vary based on your personal background. This article provides document checklists for all scenarios so that you can confidently apply for your DACA renewal or initial DACA status without an attorney.

Read More →

What is "Sanctuary" and how Does it Help Immigrants?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Immigrants in the United States have been increasingly vulnerable to raids, detentions, and deportations by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) immigration agents. As a result, many faith groups and some neighborhoods, campuses, and offices have tried to find ways to advocate for and protect the immigrants in their communities. The practice of sanctuary is one way that faith groups and other communities are trying to protect immigrants from deportation. In this article, we'll explain what sanctuary is, and how it can be helpful to immigrants who are living in a place that is a sanctuary.

Read More →

What is the B-1/B-2 visa?

Written by Jonathan Petts

The B-1/B-2 visa is a temporary, non-immigrant visa that allows foreigners to travel to the United States for business or tourism purposes. If you're traveling to the United States for a business conference or trip, you'll need a B-1 visa. The B-2 visa, on the other hand, covers tourism, such as vacations or visits with family. This article is a deep dive into the B-1/B-2 visa, explaining the visa requirements, who can apply, how much it costs, and how to apply. The article also answers some commonly asked questions about the B-1/B-2 visa.

Read More →

What is the TN visa?

Written by Jonathan Petts

There are several different categories of visas for foreign nationals entering the United States. The TN visa is available specifically for certain Canadian citizens and Mexican citizens. This article explains what the TN visa is, who’s eligible for it, and the application process. The article also answers frequently asked questions about the TN visa, including whether it’s possible to get a green card while in TN status.

Read More →

U.S. Immigration Stats - Citizenship by Naturalization

Written by Jonathan Petts

Every year, about 860,000 U.S. green card holders apply for Citizenship by Naturalization, the process by which a lawful permanent resident becomes a U.S. citizen after living in the U.S. for a period of time, usually 3–5 years. Like citizens born in the United States, naturalized citizens can vote in American elections and apply for American passports. And they can never be deported. Of the applications submitted each year, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) approves about 23%, denies about 2–3%, and leaves about 70% pending. This article covers the U.S. citizenship by naturalization process and statistics on that process.

Read More →

What Supporting Documents Do You Need to Get a U.S. Green Card for Your Child?

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you are a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident, you can sponsor your child for a Green Card. You and your child  will need to submit certain documents to the U.S. Government when you apply. The application process and documents you will need are different when the child you are seeking a Green Card for is living *__inside__* of the United States (“[Adjustment of Status](https://webflow.com/filing-guides/family-green-card-concurrent)”) and when they are living *__outside__* of the United States (“[Consular Processing](https://webflow.com/filing-guides/family-green-card-consular)”). This guide will serve as a document checklist for both processes.

Read More →

All About the Dream Act

Written by Jonathan Petts

Millions of undocumented immigrant youth called [Dreamers](https://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/Differing%20DREAM-FS-October2017_FINALWEB.pdf) live in the United States without legal status. A series of proposed laws, called the DREAM Act, could fix this problem by giving Dreamers a pathway to lawful status and, eventually, citizenship. Since 2001, the DREAM Act has never passed into law. But the DREAM Act’s most recent version was approved by the House of Representatives on March 18, 2021 and could go to a vote before the Senate. If you're looking to learn more about the history and future of the DREAM Act, this article has you covered!‍

Read More →

2022 Immigration Predictions

Written by Jonathan Petts

2021 was in many ways a [disappointing year](https://newrepublic.com/article/164752/immigration-reform-dead-build-back-better/) for immigration reform. Although the White House rescinded some Trump-era restrictions on immigration, efforts to create a path to citizenship for Dreamers and undocumented agricultural workers failed. Despite these setbacks, immigration reform remains one of the Biden Administration’s top priorities for this year. This article predicts five things that will happen in immigration in 2022.

Read More →

USCIS Has Approved Over 1300 New DACA Applications Since November Ruling

Written by Jonathan Petts

President Obama created Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) in 2012. The DACA program protects certain young people who entered the country illegally from deportation. DACA beneficiaries can get a work permit, a Social Security Number (SSN), and apply for a driver’s license. But, many have contested the legality of the program over the past few years. Trump administration officials argued that the program did not comply with current immigration laws.

Read More →

Over 60,000 Immigrants Still Waiting for USCIS to Approve Their DACA Applications

Written by Jonathan Petts

President Biden reinstated the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program soon after his election to the relief of eligible undocumented youth who missed their opportunity to get status under the Trump administration.  Many eligible immigrant youths applied for DACA six months after Biden signed the Executive Order reinstating the program. However, as many as 60,000 and more of these new DACA applicants have yet to receive approved applications from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Read More →

The ImmigrationHelp.org Scholarship

Written by Jonathan Petts

[ImmigrationHelp.org](http://immigrationhelp.org/) is a legal nonprofit founded in 2019 at Harvard University that helps low-income immigrants prepare their immigration forms for free. We provide free legal services for DACA, TPS, and Work Permits.

Read More →

USCIS Is No Longer Processing New DACA Applications - But You Can Still Apply!

Written by Jonathan Petts

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) is a vital immigration program. It allows undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children (called Dreamers) to live and work in America. DACA status keeps Dreamers free from the constant threat of deportation to unfamiliar countries. Currently, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the agency responsible for DACA applications, is no longer processing new applications. However, USCIS will accept your application if you choose to send it in. This article will provide a brief legal history of DACA and explain why USCIS is accepting but not processing applications. It will also explain how ImmigrationHelp can help you file for DACA for free and provide resources to learn more about DACA.

Read More →

What is President Joe Biden's Immigration Agenda?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Since taking office, Democratic President Biden and Vice President Harris have directed federal agencies to address immigration far differently than the previous administration. In late January of 2021, the Biden administration announced their new U.S. immigration reform plan, which focuses on increasing access to legal immigration and reforming immigration enforcement.

Read More →

How To Expunge Your Criminal Record as a DACA Applicant

Written by Jonathan Petts

You must get an immigration lawyer’s help with your application if you have a criminal history. The U.S. government will check your criminal record for any crimes that disqualify you from getting the immigration benefit you’re applying for. It may be possible to take these crimes off your criminal record; this is called expunging your criminal record. Your crimes that would otherwise disqualify you from immigration benefits will no longer count against you. The U.S. government will still see your expunged records, but they possibly won’t harm your application. This article explains disqualifying criminal convictions for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and how to get an expungement of your criminal record to apply for DACA.

Read More →

How To Find Help With Your Immigration Application When You Need Some Extra Help

Written by Jonathan Petts

ImmigrationHelp.org is a nonprofit that helps low-income Dreamers prepare their Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Advance Parole application paperwork for free. With DACA, you can access immigration benefits like work authorization and protection from deportation. ImmigrationHelp.org is not a law firm, so we cannot provide legal representation for our users. As a nonprofit, our goal is to empower you to file your DACA and Advance Parole paperwork on your own. In this article, we explain other resources you can turn to when you need a bit more help than we can provide.

Read More →

Is It Risky To Travel With Advance Parole?

Written by Jonathan Petts

For Deferred Action and Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients and adjustment of status applicants, the U.S. government makes provision for a travel document called Advance Parole. Advance Parole allows immigrants based in the United States to travel abroad while in status or while waiting for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) to process their paperwork. If you have DACA or are applying for adjustment of status, your approved Advance Parole document will serve the same purpose as a U.S. visa, allowing re-entry to the United States upon returning. In this article, we explain Advance Parole, how to get it, and highlight some of the risks involved in traveling back to the United States on Advance Parole.

Read More →

How To Get Advance Parole for Business Travel

Written by Jonathan Petts

For many people applying for immigration benefits, Advance Parole is necessary to travel abroad while they wait for the U.S. government to process their application. Other immigrants, like recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), must also have an approved travel permit before leaving the United States if they'd like to return. Advance Parole makes it possible for immigrants with business ties abroad to leave the United States temporarily for work. In this article, we'll explain what business reasons you can get Advance Parole for as well as the step-by-step application process for getting the travel permit.

Read More →

How To Get the Proof of Identity Document (ID) You Need for Your DACA Application

Written by Jonathan Petts

Every application for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) must have both the official application forms and supporting evidence to back your case. One of the most important pieces of evidence you must submit with your application is a proof of identity document (ID). U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) processes DACA applications, and they have requirements for what ID you can submit with your new DACA or DACA renewal application. This article explains what an acceptable ID is for DACA and how to get one for your application.

Read More →

What Does the USCIS Case Status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent” Mean for My VAWA Application?

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you log in to your USCIS account online and see the case status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent,” it means that USCIS needs more information from you to process your case and ensure you’re eligible for the immigration benefit you applied for. USCIS will mail a Form I-797E: Notice of Action that outlines exactly what additional evidence is needed and why. The notice will also include a deadline for submitting the requested information. It’s important to submit the requested information before the deadline to ensure USCIS continues processing your application without too much delay.

Read More →

What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Received” Mean for My VAWA Application?

Written by Jonathan Petts

When you see the case status “Case Was Received” from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), it means USCIS is acknowledging that it received your immigration application packet. This is just the start of USCIS processing your application. It hasn’t yet reviewed your application materials or determined your eligibility. Once you see this status, you’ll want to keep an eye on future status changes and respond to anything that requires your attention, such as a request for evidence. This article explains the “Case Received” USCIS status and what to do when your application is in this status.

Read More →

Advance Parole: How To Travel Abroad While Waiting for Your Green Card

Written by Jonathan Petts

The green card application can take a while. How long you wait depends on your green card type and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) case processing backlogs. If you’re applying for a green card while in the United States, you typically cannot leave until the application process is over. If you leave, USCIS will discontinue your green card application. Getting an Advance Parole travel document allows you to leave the United States while waiting for your green card and return with permission from the U.S. government. In this article, you will learn what Advance Parole is, who qualifies for it and who doesn’t, and how to apply for Advance Parole step-by-step.

Read More →

Removal of Conditions on Marriage Green Cards

Written by Jonathan Petts

Years ago, the U.S. government instituted tighter measures to help prevent marriage fraud. Issuing conditional green cards (CR-1 visas) to newly-married couples was one of those measures. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) places conditions on your green card so they can re-assess whether your marriage is based on a bona fide relationship with your spouse. This article explains the removal of conditions process for marriage green cards and answers some frequently asked questions about the process.

Read More →

What Are the Tax Filing Requirements for U.S. Nonresident Aliens?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Even if you aren’t a U.S. citizen or U.S. national, you may still need to file an IRS income tax return. Generally speaking, nonresident aliens of the United States must file an IRS tax return if they received income or were engaged in a trade or business in the United States. An individual is a nonresident alien if they are not a U.S. citizen or national and can’t pass either the green card test or the substantial presence test.

Read More →

What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Approved” Mean for My Form I-129F Application?

Written by Jonathan Petts

If your USCIS case status says “Case Was Approved,” congratulations! This status means USCIS has reviewed your Form I-129F application, determined your eligibility, and decided to grant your fiancé visa. You’ll often see several statuses before approval as your case progresses, and it can take a long time for USCIS to process and approve your application. It can take anywhere from 4–22 months for USCIS to process and approve Form I-129F applications. This article explains the case approval process with USCIS and what happens after your case is approved.

Read More →

What Is the Visa Waiver Program?

Written by Jonathan Petts

The Visa Waiver Program allows citizens from eligible countries to stay in the United States for 90 days without getting a visa. It applies to those traveling for business or tourism. This article will explain how the Visa Waiver Program works, who qualifies for it, and how it compares to a B-1 or B-2 visitor visa. If you qualify, you can save yourself time and money on your trip to the U.S., but you should also be aware of a few drawbacks.

Read More →

How To Prove Your VAWA Case to USCIS

Written by Jonathan Petts

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) allows certain immigrants who are abused by their U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (LPR) spouses, former spouses, parents, or children to apply for permanent U.S. residence without the knowledge of the abusive family member. Some applicants face challenges applying for a VAWA green card or proving their case. This article will review who is eligible for permanent U.S. residence under VAWA, how to prove your case to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services USCIS, and common challenges VAWA applicants may face.

Read More →

What Is the Process for Marrying a Non-U.S. Citizen?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Green card holders and U.S. citizens are at liberty to marry non-U.S. citizens. Their foreign spouses can get a marriage green card and live with them in the United States. The application process looks different depending on where you and your future spouse live and your respective immigration statuses. This article explains the possibilities and considerations to keep in mind when applying for a marriage green card. Specifically, the article explains what things look like if both partners are present in the United States versus if neither is and the process if only one partner is in the United States.

Read More →

How To Use Form I-912 Supporting Documents To Get a Fee Waiver

Written by Jonathan Petts

Applying or petitioning U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for immigrant benefits can be expensive. Many of the petitions or applications require fees of hundreds of dollars that you might struggle to afford. To accommodate these financial challenges, you could be eligible for a fee waiver from the USCIS by completing Form I-912. Generally speaking, many required USCIS fees can be waived if you can prove that you’re suffering from a financial hardship or otherwise meet specific income standards. To provide this proof, you’ll need to attach complete and accurate supporting documents to Form I-912.

Read More →

What Is the G-1 Visa for Foreign Diplomats?

Written by Jonathan Petts

G nonimmigrant visas are for employees of international organizations and representatives of foreign governments in the United States. This article explains all you need to know about the G-1 visa, including what the G-1 visa is, who qualifies for it and who doesn’t, and what the visa application process is.

Read More →

How To Change Status From H-1B to Marriage Green Card

Written by Jonathan Petts

The H-1B visa is a dual intent visa. Dual intent means that although The H-1B visa is a dual intent visa. Dual intent means that although it's a temporary work visa, U.S. immigration officials won't penalize you for [changing your status](https://www.immigrationhelp.org/learning-center/the-complete-guide-to-adjustment-of-status-process/) to a green card while you're in the United States in H-1B status. This is good news for you as the spouse of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident - you can apply for a green card through marriage and be on the pathway to U.S. citizenship. With the green card, you can work in the United States permanently, even after your sixth year of H-1B status. This article explains the process of applying for a marriage green card depending on your spouse's U.S. immigration status.it's a temporary work visa, U.S. immigration officials won't penalize you for [changing your status](https://www.immigrationhelp.org/learning-center/the-complete-guide-to-adjustment-of-status-process/) to a green card while you're in the United States in H-1B status. This is good news for you as the spouse of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident - you can apply for a green card through marriage and be on the pathway to U.S. citizenship. With the green card, you can work in the United States permanently, even after your sixth year of H-1B status. This article explains the process of applying for a marriage green card depending on your spouse's U.S. immigration status.

Read More →

What Is Form I-129F?

Written by Jonathan Petts

One of the benefits of naturalizing as a U.S. citizen is that you can petition the U.S. government for your foreign spouse or fiancé to join you in the United States. The U.S. government requires you to file Form I-129F on behalf of your partner as part of your petition for them. This article explains what Form I-129F is, as well as its eligibility requirements, cost, and necessary supporting documents. It also describes what happens after you file and the timeline of submitting Form I-129F to getting a green card.

Read More →

How To Complete Your U.S. Travel History on a DACA Application

Written by Jonathan Petts

In 2012, President Obama introduced the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program as protection from deportation for eligible Dreamers living in the United States without status. If you apply for DACA, you'll have a work permit and lawful immigration status that you can renew every two years. The DACA application itself is quite extensive and requires you to provide, among other things, information about your U.S. travel history. You'll have to provide the dates when you arrived in the United States, how you came in, and what your immigration status was upon arrival. In this article, we'll explain the different parts of your U.S. travel history that the DACA forms are asking for and how to provide that information.

Read More →

6 Questions About Health Insurance for Immigrants

Written by Jonathan Petts

All immigrants, documented or undocumented, can legally purchase private insurance in the U.S. if they can afford it. Depending on your immigration status, you may be able to access federal and state benefits to make healthcare more affordable. This article will help you understand the different aspects of healthcare in the U.S. and determine if you qualify for federal or state health benefits. After reading this article, you will be able to make more informed choices about your health insurance options.

Read More →

How To Make a USCIS FOIA Request

Written by Jonathan Petts

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) grants the general public the right to access records of any federal agency, including the USCIS. You may want to know what information USCIS has about you if you are facing a removal proceeding or there is a problem with your request to become a U.S. citizen through naturalization. This article will discuss the Freedom of Information Act, including how to submit a FOIA request to USCIS.

Read More →

Forms N-600 & N-600K: How to Get U.S. Citizenship for Foreign-born Adopted Children

Written by Jonathan Petts

Many American couples adopt internationally every year. The good news is that as long as your foreign-born adopted child has at least one U.S. citizen parent, they qualify to become a U.S. citizen too. You will need to file Form N-600 or Form N-600K to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for your child. The type of form you'll have to submit will depend on where your family lives. This article will explain the different circumstances that merit your applying with either Form N-600 or N-600K.

Read More →

How To Obtain Police Reports and Court Records for a Green Card Application

Written by Jonathan Petts

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) conducts a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) conducts a background check on every immigration application. If you're applying for a green card and you have had any interactions with U.S. law enforcement, you'll have to disclose your criminal record to USCIS with your application. Generally, it's a good idea to consult with an immigration attorney if you have a criminal record before submitting your green card application. This article explains how to determine if you have a criminal record, where to get a copy of your criminal record, and the step-by-step process to request a copy from U.S. federal and state authorities.

Read More →

How Can My Undocumented Immigrant Spouse Get a Green Card Through Marriage?

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you are married to an undocumented immigrant, you are not alone. According to the Wall Street Journal, about 1.2 million undocumented immigrants are married to United States citizens. And that number doesn't even include undocumented immigrants married to U.S. permanent residents. Getting a marriage green card protects your spouse from deportation and, as immediate relatives, gives them a path to naturalization. But applying for a marriage green card can be a difficult process. And in most cases, it is even more challenging when your spouse is undocumented. This article will help you weigh the benefits and risks of applying for a marriage green card for your undocumented spouse.

Read More →

A Guide to Applying for a U.S. Temporary Visa with Form DS-160

Written by Jonathan Petts

Form DS-160 is also called the Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application form. Many people applying for temporary U.S. visa classifications like student visas and fiancé visas will have to file Form DS-160 with the U.S. embassy or consulate in their home country to get permission to come to the United States. This article is a guide to Form DS-160. It explains who needs to file the form, the application process, and what happens after filing.

Read More →

How To Pay USCIS Fees With a Credit or Debit Card

Written by Jonathan Petts

The majority of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) immigration forms carry a government filing fee. USCIS uses filing fees to cover the processing costs and biometric services for your application type. You can pay for your application’s filing fees using a traditional check or money order, or more recently, a credit or debit card. USCIS does not accept or process online payments, but you can still pay with a credit or debit card using Form G-1450. This article explains how to use Form G-1450 to pay your USCIS filing fees with a credit or debit card.

Read More →

How To Translate Immigration Documents

Written by Jonathan Petts

Whether you are completing a citizenship application, marriage green card application, DACA renewal, or some other application, U.S. immigration law probably requires you to include supporting personal documents with your paperwork. If you are like most immigrants, many of these personal documents are written in a foreign language. Every document you submit to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that is written in a language other than the English language must be translated into English. In this article, we explain what USCIS's immigration translation requirements are, who is allowed to make these translations, how much professional document translation costs, and how to get a USCIS certified translation of your immigration documents.

Read More →

What Is USCIS Form I-140: Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Form I-140 forms the basis of nearly every employment-based green card application. Your employer who has agreed to sponsor a work visa for you is responsible for submitting a Form I-140 petition on your behalf to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). This article delves into Form I-140, and covers what it is, who’s eligible to file it, when to file it and how to file it with USCIS, and other considerations to bear in mind.

Read More →

TPS vs. Asylum: How Do They Compare?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and asylum are both humanitarian provisions of the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), but they are not the same thing. Sometimes one status works better than the other for your situation. This article compares the two immigration statuses so you can have a better understanding of which may be most suitable for your purposes.

Read More →

Can Undocumented Immigrants Get a Driver’s License?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Each state decides how and when its residents may obtain a driver’s license. This includes whether or not to issue driver’s licenses to undocumented immigrants. While most states will only grant driving privileges to those with lawful immigration status, some will allow individuals who can’t provide proof of legal presence in the United States to get a driver’s license. The following guide explains when someone traveling to the United States will need to get a state-issued driver’s license and what that process entails. It also covers what limitations undocument immigrants may face when trying to get a driver’s license.

Read More →

When Is a Proxy Marriage Valid in an Immigration Case?

Written by Jonathan Petts

A proxy marriage occurs when one or both partners are not physically present for the marriage ceremony. Instead, a stand-in takes their place for the ceremony. Proxy marriages are legal in some U.S. states but not in others. This article will discuss how to ensure your proxy marriage is legal under state law, when your marriage is considered legal for immigration purposes, and alternatives to proxy marriages that may make more sense for you, depending on your immigration circumstances.

Read More →

How To Apply for Citizenship by Naturalization

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you are a U.S. lawful permanent resident (green card holder) who meets residency and background check requirements, you can apply for citizenship by naturalization. There are many benefits to becoming a U.S. citizen. For example, once you become a U.S. citizen, you will be able to vote in U.S. elections, travel to and from the U.S. as you please, and apply for your eligible family members to receive U.S. green cards. The application process is pretty straightforward. For most people, it costs $725 and takes 7-15 months. This article explains how to apply for U.S. citizenship in seven easy steps.

Read More →

What Is a Receipt Number, and Where Can I Find My Receipt Number for USCIS?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Your receipt number for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is a 13-character identification code that USCIS uses to identify and track your case. The receipt number will contain three letters followed by 10 numbers. The letters identify the USCIS service center that is processing your application. The 10 numbers that follow are a combination of the date your case was opened and your unique case number. USCIS will print your receipt number on any correspondence they send you regarding your application. You will need your receipt number to check your application status. This article explains what a USCIS receipt number is, where to find it, how to read it, and how to use it to check your application's status.

Read More →

How To Complete Your Address History on a DACA Application

Written by Jonathan Petts

Many immigrants who come to the United States have moved around and changed addresses. Most U.S. immigration applications, including the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) application, ask for your address history as an applicant. This article explains what address information you need to fill out your DACA forms, how to find old address information, what happens if your address history is incomplete on your DACA forms, and what supporting documents should accompany your DACA application.

Read More →

How To Get a Marriage Green Card as a Military Spouse

Written by Jonathan Petts

It’s common for active-duty military personnel to fall in love while stationed abroad. If the couple meets the requirements, the foreign spouse can get a marriage green card in three simple steps. They will apply for a green card either from the United States or abroad, attend a green card interview, and wait for a response from the U.S. government. This article explains the requirements for the military spouse green card and the application process to follow depending on where you live.

Read More →

How To Apply for Refugee Status in the United States

Written by Jonathan Petts

As part of humanitarian provisions under U.S. immigration law, thousands of refugees come into the United States every year. These are people fleeing persecution in various forms from all around the world. This article explains what the legal definition of a refugee is, who is eligible for U.S. refugee status, and how to submit a refugee application to the United States.

Read More →

The USCIS 90-Day Rule

Written by Jonathan Petts

It is extremely important to be honest about your intentions when you apply for a U.S. nonimmigrant visa. Misrepresenting your intentions for traveling to the United States will land you in a lot of trouble with the U.S. government. One of the ways that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) confirms your travel intent is the 90-day rule. The 90-day rule states that temporary visa holders who marry or apply for a green card within 90 days of arriving in the United States are automatically presumed to have misrepresented their original intentions. This article explains the 90-day rule, including how immigration officials apply it, the consequences of breaking the rule, and how to prove nonimmigrant intent on your U.S. visa application.

Read More →

What You Need To Know About Re-Registering for Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

Written by Jonathan Petts

Temporary protected status (TPS) allows certain immigrants to live and work in the U.S., but it is not permanent. If you have TPS, you must renew your status during each re-registration period. If you fail to re-register, you can lose the essential benefits of TPS. For example, you can’t adjust your TPS status if your TPS has expired. TPS adjustment of status is one of the easiest ways to get a green card. This article helps you understand how and when to re-register.

Read More →

What Is Consular Processing?

Written by Jonathan Petts

There are two major pathways to apply for a United States green card. One method, called adjustment of status, applies when you’re already in the United States. The other method is consular processing, which refers to the process of applying for lawful permanent resident status while located in your home country. The consular process begins with filing a petition with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), which then hands it over to the National Visa Center (NVC). The NVC completes the green card application process and issues a visa allowing you to travel to the United States and get your green card.

Read More →

Green Card vs. Visa: How Are They Different?

Written by Jonathan Petts

A common misconception is that a green card and a visa are the same thing. While the two are similar, there are differences between green cards and visas. To avoid confusion, you should first understand what a visa is and what a green card is. This article explains both, then highlights the differences between green cards and visas.

Read More →

How To Apply for a U.S. Passport

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you recently became a U.S. citizen, congratulations! You are now eligible to apply for a U.S. passport. The U.S. passport process is very straightforward, and passport applications are processed much quicker than the other immigration applications you’ve been used to. This article is a step-by-step guide to the application process for a U.S. passport if you’re applying for the first time.

Read More →

What Supporting Documents Do You Need for a U.S. Marriage Green Card?

Written by Jonathan Petts

U.S. citizens and permanent residents can sponsor their spouse for a marriage green card. They and their spouse will need to submit certain documents to the U.S. government when they apply. The application process and documents you will need are different when the spouse seeking a green card is living inside of the United States (adjustment of status) and when they are living outside of the United States (consular processing). This guide will serve as a document checklist for both processes.

Read More →

Marrying a U.S. Citizen - What You Should Know

Written by Jonathan Petts

Congratulations on finding your life partner! Now is the time to figure out the logistics of getting married to your U.S. citizen spouse. This article explains how you and your spouse can live permanently in the United States. A marriage green card allows the spouse of a U.S. citizen to live and work anywhere in the United States. The article also explains the visa considerations to bear in mind when deciding whether to get married in the United States or abroad.

Read More →

What are U.S. Work Visas?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Generally, you can get work authorization as a foreigner in the United States working for U.S. employers, either as a temporary employee or as a sponsored, permanent employee. This article is a guide to all the different U.S. work visa types that exist for noncitizens of the United States. Broadly speaking, there are permanent immigrant work visas, temporary nonimmigrant work visas, and other categories of employment authorization for some nonimmigrant groups.

Read More →

What is the IR-2 immigrant visa for children of U.S. citizens?

Written by Jonathan Petts

There are visas available for foreign-born children of U.S. citizens to immigrate to the United States. The IR-2 visa is an immigrant visa available only to unmarried children of U.S. citizens. This guide explains the IR-2 visa in detail. It defines who can apply for the visa, the IR-2 visa application process, the costs involved, as well as how long it takes to process IR-2 visa applications.

Read More →

What To Do if You Are Denied Entry Into the United States With Advance Parole

Written by Jonathan Petts

For green card applicants based in the United States and people with Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) status, Advance Parole is a welcome provision. With this travel document, you can leave the United States while in DACA status or while U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) processes your green card application. Advance Parole provides a chance to visit ailing family, study abroad, attend forums and conferences abroad, and catch up with friends. But sometimes the U.S. government does not allow people with valid Advance Parole documents to reenter the United States. This article explains some reasons why the U.S. government would refuse to let you back into the country even with Advance Parole and some things you can do if you find yourself in this situation as an adjustment of status applicant or a DACA recipient.

Read More →

Common U.S. Citizenship Interview Questions

Written by Jonathan Petts

Separate from the civics questions and English language test you have to take, the USCIS officer will ask you other questions at your citizenship interview. Many of these questions will come up from the information on your A-File, and others will be follow-ups from the information you provide. This article explains what your A-File is, and also provides a sample list of common questions you can expect at your interview.

Read More →

How Long Does It Take for USCIS and the NVC To Process applications?

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you would like to track your immigration application as it moves along the immigration process or if you are wondering how to check if your application's processing is outside the expected processing timeframes, we've got you covered! This article will explore how to check your application case status - both with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and the National Visa Center (NVC) - and what to do if your application processing falls outside the normal processing time.

Read More →

What Are the Photo Requirements for a Green Card Application?

Written by Jonathan Petts

As part of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service’s (USCIS) requirements, you must submit photos of yourself with your green card application. This article explains the U.S. government’s green card photo requirements, how you can get a photo that meets these requirements, and the number of photos to include with your application.

Read More →

What Is the U.S. Citizenship Interview?

Written by Jonathan Petts

After U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has reviewed your naturalization application and processed your biometric information, they will set an interview appointment for you. Your appointment notice will have your interview date and time. Citizenship interviews typically take place at a USCIS field office — usually, one that is close to the physical address you provided on the Form N-400 form you submitted. This article explains the purpose of the citizenship interview, what to take with you, and what happens during and after the interview.

Read More →

Can You Adjust Status From TPS to a Green Card?

Written by Jonathan Petts

People with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) have permission from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to remain in the United States temporarily while their home countries are unsafe for them to return to for different reasons. If you are in the U.S. and have TPS, you may be able to get a green card and be on the path to U.S. citizenship. This article explains how to adjust your status from TPS to lawful permanent residence.

Read More →

What Is the Form I-94 Travel Record?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Nearly every foreign traveler to the United States has an I-94 travel record (also known as “Form I-94” or “I-94 Form”). U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officials issue Form I-94 to foreign travelers entering the United States. CBP officials use Form I-94 to track arrivals and departures of non-citizens visiting the United States. This article explains Form i-94 in-depth, including how it is used, how to access yours, and answers to some frequently asked questions.‍

Read More →

What Is Direct Consular Filing (DCF)?

Written by Jonathan Petts

When your green card application goes through consular processing, U.S. immigration officials at an embassy or consulate in your home country handle your application. Consular processing is the default application method for green card applicants filing from outside the United States. Direct Consular Filing (DCF) is a fast-track process for filing Form I-130, the foundation of every family-based green card application. This article is a deep dive into direct consular filing, discussing eligibility, the application process, and processing timeframes.

Read More →

How IMBRA Protects Green Card Applicants From Sponsor Abuse

Written by Jonathan Petts

Several protections are built into U.S. immigration law to shield immigration applicants from different kinds of abuse. For marriage green card applicants and fiancé visa applicants, the International Marriage Brokerage Regulation Act (IMBRA) serves as protection from abusive spouses who are sponsoring your application. This article discusses the history of IMBRA, its provisions, and how it may be helpful for your immigration application.

Read More →

How To Get a Green Card Using TPS Adjustment of Status

Written by Jonathan Petts

While temporary protected status (TPS) allows certain immigrants to live and work in the U.S., this status is not permanent. One of the easiest ways to remain in the U.S. is by using the TPS adjustment of status process to get a green card. Once you have your green card, you’ll no longer need to fear deportation if your TPS status changes or expires because you’ll be a permanent U.S. resident. This article explains the requirements for successfully changing from temporary protected status to permanent U.S. residency.

Read More →