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Work Permits and Employment

What Is a Certificate of Disposition (Certified Disposition)?

Written by Paige Hooper
Written February 2, 2023

When applying for certain immigration benefits — such as an asylum work permit or DACA status — you may need to disclose whether you have a criminal history. Having a criminal history doesn’t automatically make you ineligible for the benefit you’re requesting. But you’ll have to provide a certified disposition telling the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) how the criminal matter was resolved. This article explains what a certified disposition is, why you might need one, and how to get one.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Transferred” Mean for My DACA Application?

Written by Amy Lane Carst
Written February 2, 2023

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) case status “Case Was Transferred And A New Office Has Jurisdiction” means that USCIS moved your case to a different service center or field office. The new office will continue processing your case from there. USCIS may choose to transfer your DACA case for several reasons, including staffing shortages or processing delays. Cases may also be transferred if you, the applicant, move and are now in a new jurisdiction. If USCIS transfers your case, it will notify you via your online account and mail you a transfer notice. You don’t need to do anything, but take note that any future additional documentation for your case and any questions you have about your case will need to be directed to the new office.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent” Mean for My DACA Application?

Written by Amy Lane Carst
Written January 16, 2023

If you log in to your U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) account online and see the case status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent,” it means that USCIS needs more information from you to process your case and ensure you’re eligible for DACA status. USCIS will mail a Form I-797E: Notice of Action that outlines exactly what additional evidence is needed and why. The notice will also include a deadline for submitting the requested information. It’s important to submit the requested information before the deadline to ensure USCIS continues processing your application without too much delay.

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Everything You Need To Know About USCIS Form I-526

Written by Paige Hooper
Written January 11, 2023

Filing Form I-526 is the first step foreign investors must take to get an EB-5 investor visa. The EB-5 visa is a unique type of employment-based visa. To qualify for an EB-5, you must first invest the required capital in a qualifying EB-5 project. You also have to submit proof of your eligibility for an EB-5 visa as part of the Form I-526 filing process. This article explains what the EB-5 program is, who is eligible to file Form I-526, and how the application process works.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Approved” Mean for My Form I-765 Work Permit Application?

Written by Paige Hooper
Written January 5, 2023

If your USCIS case status says, “Case Was Approved,” congratulations! This means USCIS has reviewed your application, determined your eligibility, and decided to grant your Form I-765: Application for Employment Authorization (work permit application). You’ll often see several statuses prior to approval as your case progresses, and it can take a long time for USCIS to process and approve your application. It takes an average of 2-7 months for USCIS to process and approve work permits. This article explains the case approval process with USCIS and what happens after your case is approved.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Approved” Mean for My EB-5 Application?

Written by Peter Fargo
Written December 29, 2022

If your USCIS case status says “Case Was Approved,” congratulations! This means USCIS has reviewed your application, determined your eligibility, and decided to grant your EB-5 green card. You’ll often see several statuses prior to approval as your case progresses, and it can take a long time for USCIS to process and approve your application. It takes an average of six months for USCIS to process and approve EB-5 cases. This article explains the case approval process with USCIS and what happens after your case is approved.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Approved” Mean for My Employment Green Card?

Written by Peter Fargo
Written December 26, 2022

If your USCIS case status says “Case Was Approved,” congratulations! This means USCIS has reviewed your application, determined your eligibility, and decided to grant your employment-based green card. You’ll often see several statuses prior to approval as your case progresses, and it can take a long time for USCIS to process and approve your application. It takes an average of about 15 months for USCIS to process and approve employment-based Form I-140 applications. However, current USCIS processing times vary from 10 to 22 months depending on which type of employment green card you’ve applied for. This article explains the case approval process with USCIS and what happens after your case is approved.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Transferred” Mean for My Employment-Based Green Card Application?

Written by Peter Fargo
Written December 26, 2022

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) case status “Case Was Transferred And A New Office Has Jurisdiction” means that USCIS moved your case to a different service center or field office. The new office will continue processing your case from there. USCIS may choose to transfer your employment green card case for several reasons, including staffing shortages or processing delays. Cases may also be transferred if you, the applicant, move and are now in a new jurisdiction. If USCIS transfers your case, it will notify you via your online account and mail you a transfer notice. You don’t need to do anything, but take note that any future additional documentation for your case and any questions you have about your case will need to be directed to the new office.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Transferred” Mean for My EB-5 Green Card Application?

Written by Peter Fargo
Written December 26, 2022

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) case status “Case Was Transferred And A New Office Has Jurisdiction” means that USCIS moved your case to a different service center or field office. The new office will continue processing your case from there. USCIS may choose to transfer your EB-5 green card case for several reasons, including staffing shortages or processing delays. Cases may also be transferred if you, the applicant, move and are now in a new jurisdiction. If USCIS transfers your case, it will notify you via your online account and mail you a transfer notice. You don’t need to do anything, but take note that any future additional documentation for your case and any questions you have about your case will need to be directed to the new office.

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What Does USCIS Case Status “Case Denied” Mean for My Work Permit?

Written by Kassandra Kuehl
Written December 15, 2022

If you see “Case Was Denied” as your USCIS case status online, it means that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has received and reviewed your Form I-765 application and decided not to grant you a work permit. If USCIS denies your work permit case, it will send you a denial notice explaining why. It can be disheartening to go through months of processing for employment authorization only to have your case denied. If this happens, you may want to get legal advice about the next steps. If you decide to appeal your case, we can connect you with an independent attorney through our Ask an Attorney program.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent” Mean for My EB-5 Applicatio

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team
Written December 14, 2022

If you log in to your USCIS account online and see the case status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent,” it means that USCIS needs more information from you to process your case and ensure you’re eligible for an EB-5 green card. USCIS will mail a Form I-797E: Notice of Action that outlines exactly what additional evidence is needed and why. The notice will also include a deadline for submitting the requested information. It’s important to submit the requested information before the deadline to ensure USCIS continues processing your application without too much delay.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Transferred” Mean for My Work Permit Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team
Written December 13, 2022

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) case status “Case Was Transferred And A New Office Has Jurisdiction” means that USCIS moved your case to a different service center or field office. The new office will continue processing your case from there. USCIS may choose to transfer your work permit application for several reasons, including staffing shortages or processing delays. Cases may also be transferred if you, the applicant, move and are now in a new jurisdiction. If USCIS transfers your case, it will notify you via your online account and mail you a transfer notice. You don’t need to do anything but take note that any future additional documentation for your case and any questions you have about your case will need to be directed to the new office.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent” Mean for My Work Permit Application?

Written by Immigration Help Team
Written December 13, 2022

If you log in to your USCIS account online and see the case status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent,” it means that USCIS needs more information from you to process your Form I-765 and ensure you’re eligible for a work permit. USCIS will mail a Form I-797E: Notice of Action that outlines exactly what additional evidence is needed and why. The notice will also include a deadline for submitting the requested information. It’s important to submit the requested information before the deadline to ensure USCIS continues processing your application without too much delay.

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What Is an Employment Verification Letter?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated December 7, 2022

While applying for certain immigration benefits, the chances are high that you will need to submit an employment verification letter to the U.S. government. The employment verification letter goes by other names, including proof of employment letter and verification of employment, but it is simply a request for proof that you are gainfully employed. This article will explain the different immigration processes where you’ll have to submit an employment verification letter, what the letter should say, how you can request the letter from your employer, and how to write it if you’re self-employed.

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How To Get or Renew a U.S. Asylum Work Permit

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated December 7, 2022

Asylum is a part of U.S. immigration law that allows people fleeing persecution or violence in their home country to live and work in the United States. If you have applied for asylum and your application has been in process for more than 150 days, you can apply for a work permit. This work permit allows you to work in the U.S. while you wait for a decision on your asylum case. You may hear a work permit called an Employment Authorization Document (EAD) or an employment authorization card. You cannot work without one. After you receive an initial work permit, you can apply to renew your asylum work permit at any time. Once you apply for renewal, USCIS will extend your expiration date by 540 days. This article contains everything you need to know to apply for a U.S. work permit as an asylee and how to renew your asylum work permit.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Received” Mean for My Employment Green Card?

Written by Immigration Help Team
Written December 4, 2022

When you see the case status “Case Was Received” from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), it means USCIS is acknowledging that it received your immigration application packet. This is just the start of USCIS processing your application. It hasn’t yet reviewed your application materials or determined your eligibility. Once you see this status, you’ll want to keep an eye on future status changes and respond to anything that requires your attention, such as a request for evidence. This article explains the “Case Received” USCIS status and what to do when your application is in this status.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Received” Mean for My EB-5 Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team
Written December 4, 2022

When you see the case status “Case Was Received” from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), it means USCIS is acknowledging that it received your immigration application packet. This is just the start of USCIS processing your application. It hasn’t yet reviewed your application materials or determined your eligibility. Once you see this status, you’ll want to keep an eye on future status changes and respond to anything that requires your attention, such as a request for evidence. This article explains the “Case Received” USCIS status and what to do when your application is in this status.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Rejected” Mean for My Work Permit Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team
Written November 29, 2022

The USCIS case status “Case Rejected” means that you didn’t file your immigration paperwork correctly, so USCIS did not review your case. If USCIS rejects your case, it will return your original filing fee. To have your case reviewed, you’ll need to fix the issue that caused the rejection. Common issues that lead to rejection include filing the incorrect form version, paying an incorrect fee amount, and not signing a form. If you see the “Case Rejected” status on your USCIS account, you’ll need to refile your application and repay your filing fee to move forward with your immigration application. If you aren’t sure how to correct the mistake after reading this article, you may want to contact an attorney for help with your case. We can refer you to an experienced immigration attorney for a free consultation.

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How to Complete Form I-765 WS for Your DACA Application

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated November 22, 2022

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) provides protection from deportation for many young undocumented immigrants. When you're applying for DACA, you'll submit three main forms together with your supporting evidence to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). In addition to the official DACA application Form I-821D, Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, you'll have to file Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and Form I-765WS, the worksheet explaining why you need a work permit. This article will focus on the shortest out of the three forms—Form I-765WS. You'll learn what Form I-765WS is and why you need it, as well as how to complete the different parts of the form.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Denied” Mean for My Employment-Based Green Card Application?

Written by Immigration Help Team
Written November 15, 2022

If you see “Case Was Denied” as your USCIS case status online, it means that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has received and reviewed your employment-based green card case and decided not to grant you a green card. If USCIS denies your employment-based green card, it will send you a denial notice explaining why. It can be disheartening to go through months of processing for an employment-based green card only to have your case denied. If this happens, you may want to get legal advice about the next steps. If you decide to appeal your case, you’ll want to have a good immigration attorney at your side.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Denied” Mean for My EB-5 Application?

Written by Immigration Help Team
Written November 15, 2022

If you see “Case Was Denied” as your USCIS case status online, it means that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has received and reviewed your EB-5 application and decided not to grant you a green card. If USCIS denies your EB-5 case, it will send you a denial notice explaining why. It can be disheartening to go through months of processing for an EB-5 green card only to have your case denied. If this happens, you may want to get legal advice about the next steps. If you decide to appeal your case, you’ll want to have a good immigration attorney at your side.

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What Is the H-1B Visa?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated November 1, 2022

The H-1B visa is a U.S. work visa that allows foreign nationals working in specialty occupation jobs to live and work lawfully in the United States for U.S. employers. The H-1B visa is valid for a maximum of 6 years, and H-1B visa holders are eligible to apply for employment-based green cards. This article is a guide to the H-1B visa. It explains specialty occupation and the eligibility requirements for the H-1B visa. It also explains the H-1B visa application process and what happens after applying. You will also find the answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about the H-1B visa in this article.

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What Does USCIS Case Status “Case Rejected” Mean for My Employment-Based Green Card?

Written by Immigration Help Team
Written October 31, 2022

The USCIS case status “Case Rejected” means that you didn’t file your immigration paperwork correctly, so USCIS did not review your case. If USCIS rejects your case, it will return your original filing fee. To have your case reviewed, you’ll need to fix the issue that caused the rejection. Common issues that lead to rejection include filing the incorrect form version, paying an incorrect fee amount, and not signing a form. If you see the “Case Rejected” status on your USCIS account, you’ll need to refile your application and pay your filing fee to move forward with your immigration application. If you aren’t sure how to correct the mistake after reading this article, you may want to contact an attorney for help with your case.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Rejected” Mean for My EB-5 Green Card Application?

Written by Immigration Help Team
Written October 31, 2022

The USCIS case status “Case Rejected” means that you didn’t file your immigration paperwork correctly, so USCIS did not review your case. If USCIS rejects your case, it will return your original filing fee. To have your case reviewed, you’ll need to fix the issue that caused the rejection. Common issues that lead to rejection include filing the incorrect form version, paying an incorrect fee amount, and not signing a form. If you see the “Case Rejected” status on your USCIS account, you’ll need to refile your application and pay your filing fee to move forward with your immigration application. If you aren’t sure how to correct the mistake after reading this article, you may want to contact an attorney for help with your case.

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How To Get a TPS Work Permit

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated October 10, 2022

Temporary Protected Status or TPS is a kind of humanitarian relief issued by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to citizens of countries affected by political, social, or environmental instability. While in Temporary Protected Status, you may be granted U.S. work authorization. This article explains how to get a TPS work permit and how long you may hold a valid work permit as part of your TPS.

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What Is USCIS Form I-140: Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated October 10, 2022

Form I-140 forms the basis of nearly every employment-based green card application. Your employer who has agreed to sponsor a work visa for you is responsible for submitting a Form I-140 petition on your behalf to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). This article delves into Form I-140, and covers what it is, who’s eligible to file it, when to file it and how to file it with USCIS, and other considerations to bear in mind.

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What Is Form I-765: Application for Employment Authorization?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated October 9, 2022

Form I-765 is one of the main forms for applying for a work permit. To receive an Employment Authorization Document (EAD), you need to file Form I-765 with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). This article explains what Form I-765 is and how it’s used. We'll also explain who can file the form, how to complete it, what supporting documents to include, and how much it costs.

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Can I Get a Work Permit While Waiting for My Green Card?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team
Updated August 7, 2022

Once you get a green card, you’ll enjoy many rights and privileges as a legal resident of the United States, including the right to have a job. But it often takes a long time for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to process green card applications. During this waiting period, you can’t legally work in the United States unless you have authorization. If you want to work while you’re waiting for your green card to be approved, you have to apply for a work permit using Form I-765: Application for Employment Authorization. In this article, we take a closer look at work permits, including how to get one while waiting for a green card.

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What is the TN visa?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Written May 30, 2022

There are several different categories of visas for foreign nationals entering the United States. The TN visa is available specifically for certain Canadian citizens and Mexican citizens. This article explains what the TN visa is, who’s eligible for it, and the application process. The article also answers frequently asked questions about the TN visa, including whether it’s possible to get a green card while in TN status.

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What You Need To Know About Re-Registering for Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

Written by Jonathan Petts

Temporary protected status (TPS) allows certain immigrants to live and work in the U.S., but it is not permanent. If you have TPS, you must renew your status during each re-registration period. If you fail to re-register, you can lose the essential benefits of TPS. For example, you can’t adjust your TPS status if your TPS has expired. TPS adjustment of status is one of the easiest ways to get a green card. This article helps you understand how and when to re-register.

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What Is the O-1 Visa?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated July 19, 2022

The U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) outlines special visa categories for special immigrants. Special immigrants include people like religious workers and acclaimed entertainers and artists, among others. The O-1 visa is for extraordinarily accomplished individuals in business, education, sports, and the arts. This article is a deep dive into the O-1 visa, including its requirements, application process, filing costs, and other considerations.

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A Guide to the M-1 Visa for Vocational Students

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated July 6, 2022

There are different visa categories for foreign students who wish to pursue an education in the United States. If you would like to receive vocational training in the United States, you may be able to do so with an M-1 visa if you can meet the requirements. This article explains what the M-1 visa is, who can apply for it, and how to apply. It also answers some frequently asked questions about the student visa.

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What are U.S. Work Visas?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Written May 30, 2022

Generally, you can get work authorization as a foreigner in the United States working for U.S. employers, either as a temporary employee or as a sponsored, permanent employee. This article is a guide to all the different U.S. work visa types that exist for noncitizens of the United States. Broadly speaking, there are permanent immigrant work visas, temporary nonimmigrant work visas, and other categories of employment authorization for some nonimmigrant groups.

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Everything You Need To Know About U.S. Work Permits (EADs): What They Are, Who Is Eligible, and How To Apply

Written by Jonathan Petts
Written August 20, 2020

A work permit is an official document from the U.S. government that allows immigrants to work in the United States. It's also known as an Employment Authorization Document or EAD. You do not need to be a permanent resident to get a work permit, but you need to have an immigrant or nonimmigrant visa that allows you to live and work in the United States. DACA recipients can also get work permits. It costs $410 –$495 to apply for a work permit and takes 2-7 months to get one. The cost and timing vary based on your reason for applying as well as where you live.Some applicants don't have to pay the application fee. This article explains everything you need to know about U.S. work permits.

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