The US government is only granting DACA renewals, but you can still submit a new DACA application to hold your place in line.

Immigration News

All About the DREAM Act 2021

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated November 22, 2022

Millions of undocumented immigrant youth called Dreamers live in the United States without legal status. A series of proposed laws, called the DREAM Act, could fix this problem by giving Dreamers a pathway to lawful status and, eventually, citizenship. Since 2001, the DREAM Act has never been passed into law. But the DREAM Act’s most recent version was approved by the House of Representatives on March 18, 2021, and could go to a vote before the Senate. If you're looking to learn more about the history and future of the DREAM Act, this article has you covered!

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Weekly News Roundup: October 14, 2022 (Archive)

The fourth quarter brings with it an array of immigration news. A few things in this week's bulletin: changes in wait times for Mexican nationals applying for family-sponsored green cards, a legal challenge to visa retrogression laws, a timeline on what to expect from DACA as litigation continues, and why Anna “Delvey” Sorokin’s house arrest matters to immigration advocates.

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Why Vaccine Passports Will Discriminate Against Asylum Seekers and Refugees

Written by Darryl Rigby

COVID-19 has posed the biggest threat to human life in over a hundred years, but scientists and medical experts worked tirelessly day and night to engineer a series of vaccines in record time. Thankfully, we now have some light at the end of the tunnel and the conclusion to this nightmare is hopefully in sight. With vaccinations now administered to many of our most vulnerable groups including those in the most senior age brackets and people suffering from illness, the next stage is to offer inoculation to people who are at less risk. Experts and government advisors are optimistically predicting more or less everyone residing in Western nations should have been offered a shot by the end of the year at the very latest. As such, many governments and private companies are now pushing the idea of vaccine passports – government-issued documentation which proponents argue will simplify the process of showing proof of vaccination or test results. Vaccine passports would help airlines and businesses in the hospitality sector establish whether their customers have been vaccinated or received a negative PCR test, allowing them to refuse entry to anyone deemed to pose a risk in an effort to limit potential transmission.

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U.S. Immigration Stats - Citizenship by Naturalization

Written by Jonathan Petts

Every year, about 860,000 U.S. green card holders apply for Citizenship by Naturalization, the process by which a lawful permanent resident becomes a U.S. citizen after living in the U.S. for a period of time, usually 3–5 years. Like citizens born in the United States, naturalized citizens can vote in American elections and apply for American passports. And they can never be deported. Of the applications submitted each year, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) approves about 23%, denies about 2–3%, and leaves about 70% pending. This article covers the U.S. citizenship by naturalization process and statistics on that process.

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All About the Dream Act

Written by Jonathan Petts

Millions of undocumented immigrant youth called [Dreamers](https://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/Differing%20DREAM-FS-October2017_FINALWEB.pdf) live in the United States without legal status. A series of proposed laws, called the DREAM Act, could fix this problem by giving Dreamers a pathway to lawful status and, eventually, citizenship. Since 2001, the DREAM Act has never passed into law. But the DREAM Act’s most recent version was approved by the House of Representatives on March 18, 2021 and could go to a vote before the Senate. If you're looking to learn more about the history and future of the DREAM Act, this article has you covered!‍

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2022 Immigration Predictions

Written by Jonathan Petts

2021 was in many ways a [disappointing year](https://newrepublic.com/article/164752/immigration-reform-dead-build-back-better/) for immigration reform. Although the White House rescinded some Trump-era restrictions on immigration, efforts to create a path to citizenship for Dreamers and undocumented agricultural workers failed. Despite these setbacks, immigration reform remains one of the Biden Administration’s top priorities for this year. This article predicts five things that will happen in immigration in 2022.

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USCIS Has Approved Over 1300 New DACA Applications Since November Ruling

Written by Jonathan Petts

President Obama created Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) in 2012. The DACA program protects certain young people who entered the country illegally from deportation. DACA beneficiaries can get a work permit, a Social Security Number (SSN), and apply for a driver’s license. But, many have contested the legality of the program over the past few years. Trump administration officials argued that the program did not comply with current immigration laws.

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Over 60,000 Immigrants Still Waiting for USCIS to Approve Their DACA Applications

Written by Jonathan Petts

President Biden reinstated the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program soon after his election to the relief of eligible undocumented youth who missed their opportunity to get status under the Trump administration.  Many eligible immigrant youths applied for DACA six months after Biden signed the Executive Order reinstating the program. However, as many as 60,000 and more of these new DACA applicants have yet to receive approved applications from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

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USCIS Is No Longer Processing New DACA Applications - But You Can Still Apply!

Written by Jonathan Petts

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) is a vital immigration program. It allows undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children (called Dreamers) to live and work in America. DACA status keeps Dreamers free from the constant threat of deportation to unfamiliar countries. Currently, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the agency responsible for DACA applications, is no longer processing new applications. However, USCIS will accept your application if you choose to send it in. This article will provide a brief legal history of DACA and explain why USCIS is accepting but not processing applications. It will also explain how ImmigrationHelp can help you file for DACA for free and provide resources to learn more about DACA.

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What is President Joe Biden's Immigration Agenda?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Since taking office, Democratic President Biden and Vice President Harris have directed federal agencies to address immigration far differently than the previous administration. In late January of 2021, the Biden administration announced their new U.S. immigration reform plan, which focuses on increasing access to legal immigration and reforming immigration enforcement.

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Why Vaccine Passports Will Discriminate Against Asylum Seekers and Refugees

Written by Darryl Rigby

COVID-19 has posed the biggest threat to human life in over a hundred years, but scientists and medical experts worked tirelessly day and night to engineer a series of vaccines in record time. Thankfully, we now have some light at the end of the tunnel and the conclusion to this nightmare is hopefully in sight. With vaccinations now administered to many of our most vulnerable groups including those in the most senior age brackets and people suffering from illness, the next stage is to offer inoculation to people who are at less risk. Experts and government advisors are optimistically predicting more or less everyone residing in Western nations should have been offered a shot by the end of the year at the very latest.   As such, many governments and private companies are now pushing the idea of vaccine passports – government-issued documentation which proponents argue will simplify the process of showing proof of vaccination or test results. Vaccine passports would help airlines and businesses in the hospitality sector establish whether their customers have been vaccinated or received a negative PCR test, allowing them to refuse entry to anyone deemed to pose a risk in an effort to limit potential transmission.

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Weekly Immigration News Roundup: October 28, 2022 (Archive)

This week DHS announced that Ethiopians will be able to apply for temporary protected status (TPS). Also, USCIS says certain CW-1 petitions will be considered on time and Venezuelans will be able to take advantage of a new process so they can enter the U.S. Finally, Cubans detained in Florida will be released, and a new study reveals that immigrants help alleviate tax burdens in the U.S. Let’s dive in!

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What Is the American Dream and Promise Act, and What Does It Mean for You?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated November 1, 2022

A significant part of President Biden's campaign messaging was overturning the Trump Administration's immigration policies and establishing a path to lawful permanent residence and citizenship for undocumented immigrant youth called Dreamers. Soon after winning the election, President Biden reinstated the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program that President Obama had started in 2012. A few months into his administration, U.S. legislators restarted conversations about granting DACA recipients green cards with the American Dream and Promise Act of 2021.

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Weekly Immigration News Roundup: November 11, 2022

U.S. midterm elections were this Tuesday, Nov. 8. In a landmark effort to empower voters, two Michigan cities offered Arabic-language election ballots for the first time. This week, we’ll look at the impact election winners and voting access efforts may have on immigrants at a local, state, or federal level.  In other immigration news this week, USCIS made changes to the declaration of financial support form and to the lockbox addresses for SIJS applications. 

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Weekly Immigration News Roundup: October 21, 2022 (Archive)

This has been a busy week in immigration news, and thankfully some of it is positive. The United States government wants to fast-track applications for Afghan asylees who helped U.S. troops, a senior living facility explains why immigration is important to the country’s economy, and the ACLU filed a lawsuit on behalf of four nonprofits who want the right to provide legal counsel to their immigrant detainee clients for free.

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November 2022 Visa Bulletin

Written by Immigration Help News Team
Updated October 25, 2022

The November 2022 Visa Bulletin shows few changes in cut-off dates for family green cards for applicants from most countries. The one exception is a slight decrease in several preference categories for those applying for family green cards from Mexico. There are no changes in cut-off dates for employment-based green cards in any preference category since last month's visa bulletin. Click on your preference category below to see the most current information about your cut-off date and when you can apply for your green card.

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U.S. Immigration Stats - What is the Current State of Immigration in the United States?

Written by Jonathan Petts

The immigrant population in the United States is very diverse, representing nearly every country in the world. Every year, millions of people move to the U.S., making it the country with the most immigrants in the world. Because of this, immigration features heavily in public and political conversations in the United States. In this article, you can learn about the current state of immigration in the United States and get some answers to some of the most popular questions about immigration today.

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Weekly Immigration News Roundup: November 4, 2022

This week brings a lot of good news: Citizenship waivers for disabled immigrants have been restored, and the ACLU and other organizations unite to limit the detention of pregnant migrants. Additionally, attorneys for TPS recipients from El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Nepal will return to a federal court and continue talks to help their clients retain their status. As midterm elections come up, both Latino voters and voters in the agricultural sector bring up their immigration concerns. Let’s read!

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Immigration Weekly News Roundup: September 30, 2022

Written by Immigration Help News Team
Updated October 9, 2022

The ever-changing immigration landscape can be difficult to navigate. As we enter the final months of 2022, there’s some good news. The Department of Homeland Security has issued a final rule that will make it easier for people with limited income to get legal permanent residency (green card). The department has also extended Temporary Protected Status for people from Myanmar. Finally, the U.S. will resume visa processing for Cubans who want to visit or migrate legally. Let’s take a closer look at recent announcements.

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U.S. Immigration Stats - Family Green Cards

Written by Jonathan Petts

Every year, about 810,558 immigrants apply to become U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents (“LPRs,” better known as green card holders) through family members. Of these, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (“USCIS”) approves about 88% and denies 12%. The denial rate has been relatively consistent over the past four years. Meanwhile, the total time it takes to get approved for a U.S. Green Card (also called “Lawful Permanent Residence,” a form of legal status) has increased from 12.8 months to 19.8 months from 2016 to 2020. Family Green Card applications have four basic phases: 1) Petition, 2) Application, 3) Interview, and 4) Final Decision. USCIS or the National Visa Center may reject or deny applications at any of these phases. Whether you are applying for a Family Green Card or researching U.S. Green Card trends, this article has you covered with the stats you need to understand and navigate each of these four application phases. Keeping family units together is a core policy of US immigration law, along with such other policies as refugee resettlement, attracting skilled workers, and promoting diversity. Unlike with asylum seekers (also called “asylees”) and economic migrants, however, the United States does not limit how many spouses, parents, and minor children of US Citizens it admits each year. Even some relatives of non-citizens with green cards get green cards of their own, a system called “family preference.” Keeping family units together is central to American immigration law.

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U.S. Immigration Stats - DACA Renewal

Written by Jonathan Petts

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — also known as DACA — is a program that allows undocumented immigrants who came to the United States without immigration status as children ("Dreamers") to get lawful status and work authorization. In June 2020, the U.S. Supreme Court rejected the Trump Administration’s attempt to end DACA. In 2018, the United Nations urged the U.S. to save the DACA program and protect Dreamers. DACA lets Dreamers live and work without the constant fear of deportation. Unfortunately, DACA does not provide a pathway to citizenship by naturalization, the process by which immigrants can become U.S. citizens. DACA recipients also are not eligible to become lawful permanent residents under the Immigration and Nationality Act. Every year, on average, 351,072 people apply to renew their DACA status and work authorization. Of these, from 2015 to 2019, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) approved about 78% and denied or rejected about 7%, while about 14% remained pending. The denial rate  remained relatively stable during those four years, ranging from 5.6% to 9.2%. Meanwhile, the total time that it takes to renew DACA and its work authorization has decreased from 4.3 months in 2016 to 1.4 months in 2020. USCIS usually processes applications within 120 days, although processing times have gotten slower because of the COVID-19 crisis.

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DACA Processing Times: How Long Does It Take USCIS To Process DACA Applications? (Updated 11-29-22)

Written by Immigration Help Team

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program protects eligible undocumented young people in the U.S. from deportation, but it does not confer legal status. DACA recipients are eligible to apply for work authorization, or a work permit, so they can legally work in the United States. DACA status is valid for two years. Recipients may reapply every two years to renew their status and work authorization. The DACA program is being challenged in federal court, so the U.S. government is accepting, but not currently processing, initial DACA applications. This article lists the current case processing times for the two main DACA forms — Form I-821D: Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and Form I-765: Application for Employment Authorization Document, as well as the accompanying worksheet Form I-765WS. It also lists the case processing times for the Advance Parole application Form I-130, which many DACA recipients file.

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