The US government is only granting DACA renewals, but you can still submit a new DACA application to hold your place in line.

Immigration Forms

How To Write a Cover Letter for a DACA Renewal

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated August 15, 2022

If you’ve already been granted Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) status by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), you are eligible to renew your status every two years. You’ll need to fill out Form I-821D and submit it along with other required forms and fees to renew. It’s also recommended that you prepare a simple cover letter to include with your application as well. The cover letter allows the USCIS officer to see what’s included with your application at a glance. This article explains what a DACA renewal cover letter is and the elements it should include. It also includes a template you can use to write your own.

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How To Write a Cover Letter for Form I-129F (Petition for Alien Fiancé)

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated August 15, 2022

To prepare a K-1 fiancé(e) visa application for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), you must complete the required forms, gather supporting documents, and pay fees. It’s not mandatory to include a cover letter in your application packet, but doing so can help keep your application materials organized and make sure you don’t miss any required documents. You can also use the cover letter to highlight anything you want USCIS to know about your visa application. This article explains what a K-1 fiancé visa cover letter is and the elements it should include. There’s also a template you can use to write your own.

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How To Write a USCIS Cover Letter

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated August 15, 2022

Preparing an immigration application for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) requires filling out complex paperwork and gathering supporting documents. Using a cover letter is a great way to keep your application materials organized and make sure you don’t miss any required documents. It’s also a good opportunity to highlight anything you want USCIS to know about your application. This article explains what a cover letter is and the elements it should include. It also includes a template you can use to write your own.

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What Is Form G-1145, E-Notification of Application/Petition Acceptance?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated November 22, 2022

Mailing your completed application packet to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) is an exciting time. You have finally finished gathering your documents and filing fees for the immigration benefit you applied for, and now it's up to USCIS to process your application. There are multiple ways to keep up with USCIS' processing of your application. In addition to tracking your case status online with the USCIS website, you can sign up to receive email and text notifications about updates to your application using Form G-1145. This article explains what Form G-1145 is, and whether you should consider filing the form.

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What is USCIS Form I-130, "Petition for Alien Relative"?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Every year, many U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents sponsor green card applications for their close family members who are foreign nationals. The first step in most family-based green card application processes is filing the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) Form I-130. Form I-130 is officially called the “Petition for Alien Relative,” and USCIS uses it to verify a real and qualifying relationship between the green card sponsor and the green card applicant.In this article, we discuss the purpose of Form I-130, who can and can’t file Form I-130, the Form I-130 filing fees, and how long it takes USCIS to process the form.

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How to Expedite Your Immigration Application

Written by Jonathan Petts

During the immigration application process, your situation may suddenly change in a way that makes you need to hear back from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on your case quickly. If this happens, you may be able to submit a USCIS case expedite request to receive a quicker application decision. There is no fee to make a request. USCIS requires you to meet specific criteria, like extreme humanitarian need or potential harm to a U.S person or company if your application isn’t sped up, in order for them to approve your request. This article explains the situations where you can ask USCIS to expedite your case and provides step-by-step instructions for making an expedited request.‍

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The Ultimate Guide to the U.S. Immigration Process

Written by Jonathan Petts

The United States is a very popular immigration destination because of the many benefits and privileges U.S. citizens and green card holders enjoy. If you have decided to immigrate to the U.S., you are probably wondering what the immigration process is like. There are many different kinds of U.S. immigrant visas. Still, the U.S. immigration process generally begins with an eligible sponsor filing a petition with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for the foreign national who wants to come to the United States. This is called petitioning. If all goes well with petitioning, the next step is usually that the foreign national applies for an immigrant visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate abroad or adjusts status to lawful permanent resident status in the United States. This article will walk you through the different U.S. immigrant visa types and provide a step-by-step guide on applying for them. [ImmigrationHelp.org](http://immigrationhelp.org/) can help you [prepare your U.S. immigration application forms for free](http://bit.ly/IHOmain) with our easy-to-use online tool. Read on to learn more.

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How To Use Form I-912 Supporting Documents To Get a Fee Waiver

Written by Jonathan Petts

Applying or petitioning U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for immigrant benefits can be expensive. Many of the petitions or applications require fees of hundreds of dollars that you might struggle to afford. To accommodate these financial challenges, you could be eligible for a fee waiver from the USCIS by completing Form I-912. Generally speaking, many required USCIS fees can be waived if you can prove that you’re suffering from a financial hardship or otherwise meet specific income standards. To provide this proof, you’ll need to attach complete and accurate supporting documents to Form I-912.

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What Supporting Documents Do You Need To Become a U.S. Citizen?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated October 2, 2022

Naturalization is the process by which an immigrant to the United States applies for U.S. citizenship. In addition to the Form N-400: Application for Naturalization, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) requires certain supporting documents. You can use this article as a document checklist for the naturalization process.

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How To Write a Cover Letter for Your Form I-130 (Petition for Alien Relative) Application

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated August 21, 2022

To get a family-based green card, you need to submit Form I-130 and supporting documents to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and pay the required fees. It’s a good idea to include a cover letter with your application as well. It can help keep everything organized and gives you a chance to highlight anything in your application that USCIS should know about. This article explains what a cover letter for a family-based green card application is and the elements it should include. It also includes a template you can use to write your own.

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What Is Form G-28: Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Accredited Representative?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated October 9, 2022

Although there are a number of simple immigration processes you can handle by yourself, it may be detrimental to go through some more complex immigration legal processes on your own. When your case is complex — maybe you have a criminal record, a prior immigration violation, or a complicated backgrond — it is absolutely necessary to consult with a qualified lawyer. To include a lawyer on your immigration case, you’ll have use Form G-28. This article explains what the Form G-28 is and how it’s used, why you should file it, and how to file it.

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What Is a Receipt Number, and Where Can I Find My Receipt Number for USCIS?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated October 9, 2022

Your receipt number for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is a 13-character identification code that USCIS uses to identify and track your case. The receipt number will contain three letters followed by 10 numbers. The letters identify the USCIS service center that is processing your application. The 10 numbers that follow are a combination of the date your case was opened and your unique case number. USCIS will print your receipt number on any correspondence they send you regarding your application. You will need your receipt number to check your application status. This article explains what a USCIS receipt number is, where to find it, how to read it, and how to use it to check your application's status.

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Forms DS-260 and DS-261 and the Marriage Green Card Consular Process

Written by Jonathan Petts

You can apply for a green card from the United States or from abroad. The process of applying from outside the United States, through a local U.S. embassy or consulate, is called consular processing. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) handles the initial stages of consular processing green card applications. Then, the U.S. Department of State's National Visa Center (NVC) handles the final stages of the application processing. In this article, we explain the function of the National Visa Center (NVC) and how to file State Department forms DS-260 and DS-261 with the NVC as part of the consular green card process.

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What Is the Form I-94 Travel Record?

Written by Jonathan Petts

Nearly every foreign traveler to the United States has an I-94 travel record (also known as “Form I-94” or “I-94 Form”). U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officials issue Form I-94 to foreign travelers entering the United States. CBP officials use Form I-94 to track arrivals and departures of non-citizens visiting the United States. This article explains Form i-94 in-depth, including how it is used, how to access yours, and answers to some frequently asked questions.‍

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Everything You Need To Know About USCIS Form I-690

Written by Jonathan Petts

The United States has an extensive set of laws that control who can enter the country. If you can’t enter because one or more of these laws apply to you, you are deemed “inadmissible.” Luckily, several exceptions may allow you to receive a waiver and enter the country. To get one of these waivers, you have to fill out an application. Which application you fill out depends on why you feel you are entitled to a waiver. One such application is Form I-690 from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

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What Is Asylum and How Does It Work?

Written by Jonathan Petts

If you are in the U.S. and you can show you’ll be persecuted if you return to your home country, you can ask to remain in the United States by requesting asylum. This requires you, the asylum seeker, to show that you meet the definition of a refugee. There are three ways to apply for asylum: affirmatively, defensively (during a deportation proceeding), or with an Asylum Merits Interview after a positive credible fear determination.

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What Is USCIS Form G-28I?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated July 11, 2022

Though it's rare, you may need a foreign lawyer to represent you in a case involving the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) abroad. In these instances, you’ll need to submit a completed Form G-281 to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). This article explains what Form G-281 and how the U.S. government uses it, who can file it, and how to complete it.

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Step-by-Step Guide To Filing a Family Green Card Application Concurrently

Written by Immigration Help Team

Filing for a family green card concurrently means you file Form I-130 and Form I-485 at the same time. These two forms will be accompanied by other required (and optional) forms plus required filing fees to form your green card application or petition. Most concurrent family green card applications take 7-15 months and cost $1,760.

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How To File a Family Green Card Application Non-Concurrently: A Step-by-Step Guide

Written by Immigration Help Team

When you file for a family green card non-concurrently, an eligible family member petitions for you with Form I-130 and you file Form I-485 at a different time. Because you are submitting the forms at different times, this process will take longer than filing concurrently — or submitting your Form I-130 and I-485 at the same time. This article outlines the 13 steps of filing for a family green card non-concurrently.

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Advance Parole: How To Travel Abroad While Waiting for Your Green Card

Written by Jonathan Petts

The green card application can take a while. How long you wait depends on your green card type and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) case processing backlogs. If you’re applying for a green card while in the United States, you typically cannot leave until the application process is over. If you leave, USCIS will discontinue your green card application. Getting an Advance Parole travel document allows you to leave the United States while waiting for your green card and return with permission from the U.S. government. In this article, you will learn what Advance Parole is, who qualifies for it and who doesn’t, and how to apply for Advance Parole step-by-step.

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How Long Do Immigration Applications Take and What Should I Do if Mine Is Taking Too Long?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated November 14, 2022

Many factors affect the time it takes U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to process immigration applications, including the type of benefit you’re applying for and which USCIS service center or field office is processing your forms. This article covers the factors that affect immigration application processing, how to check your case status throughout processing, and what to do if your application is taking longer than the average processing time.

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What Is an Alien Registration Number (A-Number), and Where Can I Find It?

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated October 2, 2022

An A-Number (Alien Registration Number) is a 7-9 digit number that USCIS uses to identify immigrants who apply to live in the United States permanently, as well as certain student immigrants. If you are such an immigrant and are applying for additional immigration benefits, you will probably need your A-Number to submit the required forms and to track your application. This article explains how A-Numbers work, and where you can find yours when you need it.

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All About USCIS Form I-693: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record

Written by Upsolve Team
Updated September 1, 2022

The U.S. government must ensure that foreigners immigrating to the United States do not spread contagious diseases when they come to America. To do this, most immigrants must submit a completed Form I-693 to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). USCIS Form I-693 is the medical examination form that an approved doctor must complete for green card applicants. This article explains how to meet green card eligibility with Form I-693, how to find a doctor to complete the form, and how to submit the form to the U.S. government.

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How To Pay USCIS Fees With a Credit or Debit Card

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated November 15, 2022

The majority of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) immigration forms carry a government filing fee. USCIS uses filing fees to cover the processing costs and biometric services for your application type. You can pay for your application’s filing fees using a traditional check or money order, or more recently, a credit or debit card. USCIS does not accept or process online payments, but you can still pay with a credit or debit card using Form G-1450. This article explains how to use Form G-1450 to pay your USCIS filing fees with a credit or debit card.

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A Guide to Applying for a U.S. Temporary Visa with Form DS-160

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated August 22, 2022

Form DS-160 is also called the Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application form. Many people applying for temporary U.S. visa classifications like student visas and fiancé visas will have to file Form DS-160 with the U.S. embassy or consulate in their home country to get permission to come to the United States. This article is a guide to Form DS-160. It explains who needs to file the form, the application process, and what happens after filing.

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